When first assessing our concept sketch, we noticed a remarkable similarity to a classing Lamborghini Aventador. The geometries in the profile were nearly identical. From here, we decided to place a profile show of the car itself in our file and trace it using the Sketch Image tool. This allowed us to get some of the more intricate parts of the profile, such as the gentle sloping of the hood and dramatic curves of the wheel wells and back spoiler. Given the sharper edges and fluid body of the car, we decided that splitting it lengthwise rather than top-bottom would be beneficial to our injection molding process. This would allow us to focus on one half of the car, and be more attentive to replicating the intended design without molding constraints affecting it. We proceeded to model a profile, extrude half, cut away the top profile (to accurately include nose and tail detailing), shelled, then cut the wheel wells post-shell. Our geometries had no issues with shelling once we worked on the geometries of the nose and tail. There are two points in the tail that may produce sinking when molded, but we are expecting it will not be a prevalent issue. Once shelled and cut, we mirrored the half to create one whole shelled car with wheel wells.

Upon inspection by Broughal student, she approved of the design. She selected a black color and picked the name Lambo Launch, and suggested adding the door indentations to capture the spirit of the Aventador.

 

Team 16:

Use the Navigation arrows below to view the images for this team. Click on the image itself for a larger view &more detailed description

3D PDF File of Vehicle
3D PDF File of Mold Plates
Vehicle Concept

Vehicle Concept

The concept sketch is provided by the Broughal “customers” and is the basis for the vehicle design. After some discussion and possible modification, the concept will be rendered as a CAD model by the Lehigh team members.

CAD Model

CAD Model

SolidWorks CAD rendering of the vehicle concept. The CAD geometry will be used to create the cavities in the injection mold plate inserts.

3D Printed Prototype

3D Printed Prototype

3D Printed Part created on a Makerbot 5th Gen Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) machine. The prototype is printed directly from the CAD model file much like a page is printed from a document. In this case the FDM is printed in three dimensions, in very thin layers from the bottom up. The prototype can be used to assess the size and design features of the vehicle as well as to test out some paint schemes. One could even attach wheels to get an idea of the overall look and speed of the vehicle.

Mold CAD Model

Mold CAD Model

SolidWorks rendering of the mold inserts. The mold geometry includes the cavities for the vehicle plus the runners and gates which allow the polymer melt to flow into the cavity during molding.

Machined Molds

Machined Molds

The finished mold plates have been machined on the HAAS NC milling machine and are ready to be mounted in the injection molding machine. Note the small holes in the mold cavity. The holes will be fitted with ejector pins used to eject the cooled part from the cavity at the end of the molding process.

As Molded Vehicle

As Molded Vehicle

This is molded vehicle as it looks when it is ejected from the mold on the injection molding machine. The vehicle is ready for assembly (if needed), paint & wheels.

Race Ready Vehicle!

Race Ready Vehicle!

Finally, the car has been painted and the wheels have been attached. Weight may be added to the actual race vehicle to bring it up to the maximum weight limit of 40 grams. After that, the vehicle is ready for some trial runs on the practice track.